How To: Hip Swivel vs. Pressure


The Hip Swivel is a great move to use when a defender jams your hips and pressures the ball. When working on this move keep the following five teaching points in mind in order to relieve pressure.


1. CLOSED DRIBBLE STANCE


When an aggressive primary (on-ball) defender pressure you, move your body into a closed stance position to protect the ball. In other words, get to a ball-you-man relationship. This is done by bringing the opposite shoulder (non-dribble hand) into the chest of the defender. Maintain good posture with a low and wide stance (2 steps outside of the shoulders preferred for balance)


2. DON'T TURN YOUR BACK TO THE DEFENDER


Especially at the youth levels, a young ball handler's instinct when first dealing with pressure is to completely turn their back to their defender. It's important that the ball handler maintains the closed dribble stance position mention above in order to maintain the ability to blow-by and create off of the dribble. This can't be done when our body is positioned with a "back to chest" position.


3. MAINTAIN VISION OF THE COURT


While the Hip Swivel is initially positioned from a closed dribble stance position, it's important to maintain vision of the floor to see the spacing, cutting teammates and simply make good decisions. The ball handler should keep their chin attached to the shoulder closest to the defender to keep eyes up the court.


4. BALL FIRST THEN FEET // OPEN DRIBBLE STANCE


In order to create an advantage, the dribble timing of the "swivel" is the most important detail when performing this move in order to create space with an advantage. The ball handler should pound the ball onto the floor first THEN swivel their hips and feet into an open, sprinter stance position for the blow-by. While it may be counter-intuitive, ball handlers should be playing from an OPEN SPRINTER STANCE position (with wide and low hips). For example, if the ball handler is dribbling with their right hand, their right foot should be forward after the swivel to maintain open hips and with the ability to explode off of their opposite back foot (Load/Trigger Step) for a quick first step. This also allows the ball handler to be narrow and attack outside the hips of the defender much more effectively.


5. COUNTER WHEN THE DEFENDER JUMPS THE DRIBBLE HAND


Lastly, if the defender cuts you off and cheats the Swivel to the dribble hand, add a change of direction move to beat them in the opposite direction. To make a counter read, the ball handler should split the defender's body into 3 frames: Right Frame, Center Frame, and Left Frame. For example, if the defender cheats to the ball handler's right frame on the swivel and ball is in the right hand, the ball handler should exchange their dribble with a crossover, between the legs or behind the back dribble (and vice versa for the other hand) to the left hand. If the defender stays even with you (center frame), then the options are wide open to: Swivel > Go, Swivel > Exchange, Swivel > Inside Out, and Swivel > Double Exchange.


LEARN THIS MOVE IN-PERSON


The Hip Swivel is taught to every player that works with Mychal Martinez Basketball as it is considered a fundamental skill of our Handling Pressure curriculum. To find a session near you and improve your player's ability to handle aggressive defenders, click the link below.


FIND A SESSION

Home | About | Blog | Contact

©2020 Mychal Martinez Basketball, LLC.